National Geographic, Februrary 2019

The tool is made from a bundle of prickly pear cactus spines, their tips saturated with dark pigment, inserted into a handle carved from lemonade sumac and bound with yucca fiber.

Pacific Standard, May 2018

This is Rosa's life now: avoiding deportation by remaining on church grounds. 

The Atlantic, March 2018

For a decade, zookeepers have known that something strange was stopping gorillas’ hearts—and now they’re beginning to trace the culprit to their guts.

Outside, February 2018

An investigation of sexual harassment in outdoor workplaces, where unwanted advances, discrimination, and assault are a frequent and destructive occurrence for far too many women. 

Utne Reader/The New Territory, Fall 2017

Lenwa's family worries that the coming winter will be hard on her, as it is on most elders who grew up without winter; who came to the United States to get better but are dying instead.

Adventure Journal, October 2017

To belong to a place, sometimes you have to confront the darkness.

High Country News, October 2017

In the Southwest, Pueblo people are helping archaeologists untangle the science of human migrations.

Outside, December 2016

In Baltimore, a newly mandatory Outward Bound program brings together police and local kids to take steps toward easing tensions.

FiveThirtyEight, October 2016

Biologist Valerie McKenzie is trying to use endangered toads’ own microbes to save their lives. 

High Country News, July 2016

A historic legal victory could give Alaska tribes more control over their fish, wildlife and homelands.

High Country News, June 2016

How a Utah county silenced Native American voters for decades -- and how Navajos are fighting back. 

Adventure Journal, March 2016

It's not the wilderness that's a threat -- it's what we find in the front-country.

Smithsonian, February 2016

Science and tradition resurrect a lost art in the Marshall Islands. 

Orion, January 2016

A brutally real, painfully beautiful glimpse of what it’s like to carry a body battered by cancer through a world also battered by cancer.

Hakai Magazine, November 2015

Can Marshall Islanders whose lives are tied to the sea maintain their culture in landlocked Oklahoma? 

High Country News, October 2015

Alaska's pragmatic senior senator wants to reshape America's energy strategy. You just don't want to see her when she's mad.

High Country News, Nov. 2014

Why, when our hearts are as raw as a piece of meat pecked at by ravens, are we drawn to one of the most unforgiving places imaginable? 

High Country News, August 2015

Ancient artifacts in the thawing North vanish before archaeologists can document them.

High Country News, June 2015

Jake is the second-oldest of the 12 Adams’ children. Diana is the ninth. They do not discuss drilling at the dinner table. 

High Country News, Dec. 2014

Do mountain goats belong in Utah's La Sal Mountains? 

Slate, October 2014

Last year, the Park Service spent about $100,000 studying wolves in Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve. The state spent roughly the same amount to kill them. 

High Country News, Sept. 2014

The desire to understand this one place has surpassed science and become a kind of love.

High Country News: October 2013

In rural Alaska, villages struggle to keep their schools open.

 

High Country News: March 2014

Scientists predicted Prince William Sound would recover within 15 years, but today, residual oil continues to harm both human and ecological communities. 

Orion magazine: April 2012

As my restless twenties roll by, I find that the place I live is ever-evolving, the outward reflection of something deeply internal. 

New Zealand Wilderness: September 2013

In New Zealand's wildest corner, a debate pitting wilderness against tourism hits home for a family of homesteaders.

The Valley News: June 2012

First, there are the ashtrays: several in every room, all overflowing with Parliament Lights, clouds of fine grey ash rising from them as if from tiny cancerous volcanos. 

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​© 2013 Krista Lee Langlois